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BeeManiacs contributing to Initiative for Nationwide Detection of Ss1 (INDES)

The University of Wisconsin-Stout is conducting research on Ss1 bacterium in honey bees and varroa mites. The goal of this effort is to recruit beekeepers in all 50 US states that will provide samples of analysis of Ss1 bacterium. The name of the program is Initiative for Nationwide Detection of Ss1 (INDES).

BeeManiacs collected dead mite samples following UW-Stout protocols and mailed the samples last March, contributing information from Eastern Washington State.

UW-Stout studies led to the discovery and reporting in 2016 of Serratia marcescens strain sicaria (Ss1) bacterium, a potential new threat to hives. Much of the work has been done by students at UW-Stout lab.

The goal of the INDES effort is to obtain samples of Varroa destructor mites and honey bees that will allow to better identify locations where the Ss1 bacterium is found. A clearer understanding of the bacterium’s location will provide more information about its potential impact on bee health.

You can see below some pictures of our mite collection for this program and also some links for more information about Ss1 bacterium.

 

Research buzz: UW-Stout professor, students identify bacterium that may kill honey bees

One thought on “BeeManiacs contributing to Initiative for Nationwide Detection of Ss1 (INDES)

  1. UPDATE FROM UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-STOUT

    The sample from BeeManiacs yard had no traces of Serratia marcescens strain sicaria (Ss1).

    Eventually, the university will set up a webpage showing in which states they found this bacterium.

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